Resident Artist – July 2020

Roberto González:
Welcome Roberto González, Timucua’s resident artist for the month of July. Roberto paints a colorful perspective of Mexican heritage that outlines a story of self-discovery. His polyptych mural “The Continental Shelf” illustrates a fluid mix of blues swirling around the One Eleven building in downtown Orlando. He showcases work around Central Florida, participating in the Hispanic Artists and Culture Exhibition at the Osceola Center for the Arts. Timucua’s music publication Piano Anthology Number One features Roberto’s “Night Sea” on the front cover. We are excited to share his work with our audience this month!

Website
http://www.artbyrobertogonzalez.com/

Live Art
Timucua hosts a 4-week residency program for visual artists. We invite painters, sculptors, and other visual artists to showcase their work in the concert hall. Artists also work on stage alongside musicians. However, due to the conditions set by COVID-19, artists now work from the safety of their homes.

Juneteenth Read-Along

Juneteenth For Mazie By Floyd Cooper

Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, when slavery finally ended in America. Although the Emancipation Proclamation formally freed slaves two and a half years earlier, the order was slow to take effect in Southern states like Texas and Florida. Many slaveholders moved further South during the American Civil War to escape the fighting. On June 18, Union Army General Granger arrived at Galveston Island in Texas on behalf of the federal government. The following day, Granger announced the total emancipation of enslaved people.

Sankofa Read Aloud presents a reading series on YouTube that addresses the need for representation of African Americans in children’s literature. The Sankofa Read Aloud page says, “ I believe that it is vital that African American children are able to see themselves within the beautiful stories that they read. At Sankofa Read Aloud, your child will encounter a variety of short stories written for them by amazing authors.” 

Juneteenth For Mazie by Floyd Cooper empowers children by teaching them about the liberation of African Americans.

Timucua also believes that children learn the importance of their identity through representation in the arts. Juneteenth For Mazie by Floyd Cooper empowers children by teaching them about the liberation of African Americans. Cooper’s character Mazie learns about self-value by honoring her ancestor’s journey to freedom. This year we invite you and your family to read Cooper’s book and celebrate Juneteenth.

Click here to purchase Juneteenth For Mazie on Amazon Smile.

Resident Artist – June 2020

Live Art 

Timucua hosts a 4-week residency program for visual artists. We invite painters, sculptors, and other visual artists to showcase their work in the concert hall. Artists also work live on stage alongside musicians. However, due to the conditions set by COVID-19, our resident artists are working from the safety of their homes. 

About Virginia Zuelsdorf: 

This June, Virginia Zuelsdorf joins Timucua Arts Foundation in presenting a series of inspiring live stream performances. Zuelsdorf is a local Orlando painter and photographer. Her visual art reflects a “multi-hued” dream expressed through portraits of nature. Zuelsdorf pulls inspiration from Impressionists and German Expressionists, both of which embody the artist’s inner feelings and ideas about reality. 

Click here to view Zuelsdorf’s Instagram 

Click here to view Zuelsdorf’s Website

Resident Artist – May 2020

Live Art
Timucua hosts a 4-week residency program for visual artists. We invite painters, sculptors, and more to showcase their work in the concert hall. Artists also work on stage alongside musicians. However, due to the conditions set by COVID-19, artists now work from the safety of their homes. This May, Homero Daniel Rodriguez joined the Timucua Arts Foundation in presenting a series of live stream performances to inspire you.

Bio
Homero Rodriguez was born in Bogota, Colombia in 1992. He has participated in two international Art Biennials contests in Bogota. His paintings were published in the Artist Book. Homero now resides in Central Florida, where he paints, plays the violin, and studies science and engineering. Click here to find out more about Homero by visiting his website.

All of Homero’s work is for sale. Visual artists keep 100% of proceeds from any pieces they sell. Scroll down to learn more about Homero and his work.

About Homero Daniel Rodriguez’s Work:
Homero is currently studying electrical engineering and physics. He primarily works with pastels and oil paints. His subjects include iconic figures such as Juan Ponce de Leon and Juan Pablo II. When he’s not studying or painting, Homero loves to learn about other cultures and languages. Check out his social media pages to find out more about his art.

Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/homerodanielrodriguez7/

YouTube Channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYY4QGgQEdaot54v5gLDVCA

Facebook Artist
https://www.facebook.com/HomeroDanielRodriguez/

COVID-19 Freelance Artist Resources

Hello,

Thank you Florida Cultural Alliance for providing these resources to artists. The “COVID-19 Freelance Artist Resources” provides opportunities and financial relief options available to artists of all disciplines. Check the “Table of Contents” for more info. Also, check out the Americans for the Arts site for news about the impact of COVID-19 on the arts in America. Included is a survey, blog posts, and articles for artists and foundations alike.

All the best,
Timucua Arts Foundation

Click here to check out COVID-19 Freelance Artist Resources

Click here to check out Americans for the Arts

Addressing COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

Hello folks,

At Timucua, our mission is to inspire you through engaging experiences of the arts. That includes making you feel welcome and safe. To minimize the risk of spreading COVID-19 (coronavirus), we are making a few changes. 

  • Until further notice, we ask that guests no longer bring food to share at our events. Instead of bringing food, consider bringing a bottle of wine or a box of tissues to share. So, finger foods – out. Eating at fantastic neighborhood restaurants like Hungry Pants and The Delaney – in. 
  • We ask that you do not shake hands at Timucua events. Instead (as Benoit and I are both huge Star Trek nerds), offer the Vulcan salute. Also acceptable:  pantomiming that you are stuck in a box. And if you sneeze, use a tissue. Then wash your hands.

    Instead of shaking hands, do this.

    Don’t do this.
  • If you or someone you know is sick, self-quarantined, or just laying low to stay on the safe-side, watch our upcoming concerts live on YouTube! The video and sound quality are both high definition, and technically you don’t need to wear pants.

Our staff and volunteers will all be washing their hands regularly, and we have extra stock of hand sanitizer, tissues, paper towels, and soap. We will follow CDC guidelines and update our policies as necessary. 

With your support, we’ll keep the music going.

All the best,

Christopher Belt
Executive Director, Timucua Arts Foundation

Timucua Presents: Spring Jazz

Jane Bunnett and Maqueque

Timucua Announces Series of Ticketed Jazz Concerts through May

The ticketed concerts will take the organization to a new level of excellence in its jazz offerings, complementing its pay-what-you-can admission format for most of its Sunday evening events. 

The series kicks off on March 12 with Jon Roniger and the Good for Nothin’ Band, a five-piece New Orleans-style jazz, blues, and funk group, and runs until May 29, with the appearance of guitarist Don Soledad, whose soulful flamenco sound combines Latin jazz and hint of bossa nova. Following Roniger, Timucua welcomes pianist, genre-bending composer and educator Dave Meder, who is becoming one of the most prominent artists of his generation.

The world-class performances will include renowned artists from as far afield as Sweden and Germany, encompassing a diversity of stiles. Offering accessible admission fees, jazz enthusiasts from around Central Florida and beyond are encouraged to attend. In addition, students, veterans, and active military personnel save 50 percent on all ticketed events.

“Dave Meder is a new voice among the best in the world of jazz,” says Benoit Glazer, Timucua’s artistic director. “He masters the piano to the point that labels are inadequate,” he says. “A true virtuoso, he rarely flashes technical brilliance; rather, he plays with music as a child plays with a new toy.” Meder’s latest release for piano trio, Passage, explores progressive ideas in harmony, rhythm, and improvisation, which earned him an ASCAP Foundation 2020 Herb Alpert Young Jazz Composer Award. Established in 2002, the accolade encourages young gifted jazz composers aged 30 or below.

All About Jazz has praised Meder for “inventing his music freely, bringing honky-tonk, swing, blues, rock-and-roll—in other words a vibrant hybrid of the whole American spectrum.” Constantly fresh and always surprising, the 29-year-old pianist has already found a uniquely versatile artistic voice, evident in Passage. “You will love Dave,” comments Glazer. “The loving playfulness behind every note he plays is captivating.”

Following Meder, Jane Bunnett and Maqueque make their second appearance at Timucua on March 20, after a spectacular debut in 2018. Bunnett, a five-time Juno Award winner and three-time Grammy Award nominee, has turned her bands and recordings into showcases of the finest musical talent from Canada, the U.S., and Cuba. The internationally acclaimed Canadian instrumentalist is known for her creative integrity, improvisational daring, and courageous artistry, while displaying her versatility as a saxophone player and pianist. “She’s at ease in the world of free jazz, cool, straight-ahead jazz, and folk-infused improvisational journeys,” says Glazer. “Her love of Cuban music and her desire to support and lift up other women musicians propels this project to the world stage.”

Bunnett’s exploration of Afro-Cuban melodies expresses the universality of music; her ability to embrace the rhythms and culture of Cuba has been groundbreaking. Her latest project is Maqueque, which she is bringing to Timucua, is an all-female band of young Cuban artists who blend folkloric grooves and jazz. Bunnett has also received the Order of Canada, the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal, and, most recently, the Premier’s Award for Excellence. 

“The mix between Jane and the band elevates both parts to a new level of fusion that satisfies the soul and restores the mind,” says Glazer. “Just ask anyone who saw them at Timucua the last time they were in Orlando!” 

The full line-up for March, April, and June is:

    • March 12: Jon Roniger and The Good For Nothin’ Band—New Orleans Style
    • March 14: Dave Meder Trio
    • March 20: Jane Bunnett and Maqueque
    • March 25: Per Danielsson—Tenor Sax Legacy Project
    • March 29: Ella & The Bossa Beat
    • April 13: Victor Prieto
    • April 23: Ulysses Owens Quintet
    • May 6: Peter Brötzman—FULL BLAST [Brötzmann-Pliakas-Wertmueller]

 

  • May 29: Don Soledad

 

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American Sign Language Interpreters for Vocal Concerts

Jazz Vocalist Kristina Koller.

Timucua Arts Foundation is proud to announce a new series of vocal music performances interpreted in American Sign Language for the deaf and hard of hearing. The series features two concerts by contemporary Jazz vocalists, one classical voice recital, and a performance by the Helena collective, a contemporary vocal ensemble. The series is made possible in part by an Accessibility grant from United Arts of Central Florida.

“This won’t be the first time that a performance has been ASL interpreted at Timucua, but it is the first time we have looked ahead tried to build a series for the deaf and hard of hearing,” says Timucua Executive Director Chris Belt. “I’m excited to open our doors to a new audience, and to add depth to the experience for everyone.”

The series kicks off on March 15th with progressive Jazz vocalist Kristina Koller, who is no stranger to working with ASL interpreters. “This is amazing,” says Koller. “A fan of mine from Arizona made a music video and put sign language to my original song ‘Hold On.’” 

Each concert will be preceded by a 6:30PM social event where deaf and hard of hearing audience members can socialize, tour the venue, and view the current visual art exhibition. Admission to all events is free, with donations encouraged. Guests are also encouraged to bring food and wine to share.

Sunday, March 15th
Performer: Kristina Koller
Visual artist: Jason Hunt
6:30PM deaf social
7:00PM doors
7:30pm show

Sunday, April 19th
Performer: Virginia Schenck
Visual Artist: Charles Everett
6:30PM deaf social
7:00PM doors
7:30pm show

Sunday, August 2nd
Performer: Zoe McCrae
Visual Artist: TBD
6:30PM deaf social
7:00PM doors
7:30pm show

Sunday, August 30th
Performer: The Helena Collective
Visual Artist: TBD
6:30PM deaf social
7:00PM doors
7:30pm show